The Cup of Knowledge: A Key To The Mysteries Of Divination by Willis Mac Nicol

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British Copyright, No. 11821, March 1924. 43 pages. Four plates. Accompanying text to the Aynsley Cup of Knowledge Fortune Telling Tea-Set. Includes extract booklet and order form. Internal foxing throughout, binding solid. A very good example of a rare item, usually seen in a less-than attractive state. 

'The Cup of Knowledge: A Key To The Mysteries Of Divination by Willis Mac Nicol, British Copyright, No. 11821, March 1924. First edition. 43 pages. Four plates. Accompanying text to the Aynsley Cup of Knowledge Fortune Telling Tea-Set.

‘It is generally accepted that the Chinese and Egyptians were more advanced in some particular respects thousands of years ago than we are today. Tea drinking has, of course, been a Chinese accomplishment ever since the history of China could be traced. One of the discoveries made in recent years is drinking a bowl of tea which, judging by the characters impressed on it, is used as a means of divination. What wonderful happenings have been foretold or foreseen by the ubiquitous combinations falling into strange diagrams, or the extraordinary representations of everyday objects!

The faculty of divination is one that is temperamental and most highly developed in certain individuals, irrespective of the degree of learning or education to which people lay claim. Often the most ignorant are the best diviners. It is foolish, however, to presume that the ignorant are more prone than others to believe in these things.

By applying the exact science of cartomancy to certain standard divinations from tea leaves, we get the formidable combination of occult mystery set forth in the Cup of Knowledge. Following these ancient ideas, it enables nearly anyone to put into practice a method of divination; based on reliable data that has been sifted from the historical facts of many centuries.

Here in this book you will find the answers to the mysteries of fortune telling, with complete symbolic meanings attached to each card, and the tea leaves which fall in your cup.'

"Some are inclined to jeer at the fortune in the tea-cup, but if the language of symbolism is rightly understood, the medium through which it is seen matters little."

In 1924 the British Government held a Colonial Exhibition at Wembley in an attempt to strengthen the bonds within the British Empire and stimulate trade. Here, the Aynsley Cup of Knowledge Fortune Telling Tea-Set was displayed along with this text.'